A key to

For millennia, Tallinn has been a gateway between East and West. Sokos Hotel Estoria is like a key that opens up phenomenon called Estonia. It is a unique and cosy business class hotel that provides high-quality service, opportunity to rest, relax, and learn something interesting about Estonia at the same time.

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Stories of Estonia

The highest in Northern Europe

Do you know what it feels like to dangle your feet sitting on the edge of a roof at a height of 175 meters?

Tallinn TV Tower, which is 314 metres high, sports the highest outdoor terrace in Northern Europe at 175 metres. You can also stroll along the edge of the roof of the TV Tower.

On a fine day, you can see Helsinki, 80 kilometres from Tallinn. For Estonians, the Soviet occupation symbolised the impossibility of seeing the free Europe.

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Sport is good

Did you know that estonians are sport fanatics?

Estonians believe that sport is good, and great athletes always draw much public attention in these parts. Yes, both special sport stars and special sport events are held in esteem in Estonia!

Competing is within everyone’s powers! For example mosquito catching is gaining popularity as a sport. In 2011, Estonia even hosted the World Championships in this event. In this event, everyone can set records – whoever catches the most mosquitoes in two minutes wins!

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The Kingdom within the Republic

Did you know that the Kingdom of Setomaa lies Estonia’s southeast corner?

Living where East meets West, Seto people also call themselves the King’s people or a vool (free) people. The country is ruled by Peko, the Seto fertility god. On the first Saturday of August, King Peko calls together his people in Setomaa from everywhere and the Seto Kingdom is visited by the President of the Republic of Estonia, who is received by the ülembsootśka.

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Estonian History Museum

Did you know that the oldest object with the likeness of a dragon in Continental Europe was found in Tallinn?

The knife sheath, presumably made in London in the 13th century, is in the archaeological collection of the Estonian History Museum.

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A mummy in Tartu

Did you know that you do not have to go to Egypt to see a mummy? Apart from everything else, the main building of the University of Tartu also houses a mummy.

In 1819, Otto Magnus von Richter, District Magistrate of Livonia, gifted the collection assembled by his son during his travels to the University of Tartu in order to encourage scientific enterprise in the coming generations. Ancient relics also include two human mummies from Egypt and the mummies of a dog and a bird.

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James Bonds camera from Estonia

Did you know that the world’s most famous mini camera, Minox, was invented in Estonia?

The story of the invention of the mini camera dates to the World War II Estonia where the inventor of the camera, a Baltic German by the name of Walter Zapp, lived as a young man.

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Best of Jazz – Jazzkaar

Did you know that the biggest jazz festival in the Baltic States has been going a year longer than the Republic of Estonia’s renewed period of independence? Jazzkaar has been held since 1990; Estonia regained its independence on 20 August 1991.

Performers at Jazzkaar have won a grand total of over ninety Grammys over the years! The highest number of Grammys, twenty, have been won by the guitar king Pat Metheny, who was also the featured performer at the Jazzkaar anniversary in 2014.


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The only magazine in USSR

Did you know that from 1958, the only home decorating magazine, Art and Home (Kunst ja Kodu) Almanac, was published in the Estonian Soviet Socialist Republic?

The Almanac addressed in great detail issues that were related to new homes, mostly small flats, including coverage of their layout and decoration. The publication of ideas by prized interior decorators’ included recommendations for making one’s home as practical and beautiful as possible.

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The fifth season

Did you know that about one-fifth of all land in Estonia is covered by mires? In terms of the abundance of natural mires, we rank third in the world, after Finland and Canada.

The fifth season or high water happens in low-lying wetland areas in spring, mostly in April, when large quantities of water from melting snow pour into the valleys and lowlands. Then you can only get around without getting your feet wet if you use small watercraft or haabjad (dugouts).

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