A key to
Estonia

For millennia, Tallinn has been a gateway between East and West. Sokos Hotel Estoria is like a key that opens up phenomenon called Estonia. It is a unique and cosy business class hotel that provides high-quality service, opportunity to rest, relax, and learn something interesting about Estonia at the same time.

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Stories of Estonia

Let´s Do It, World!

Did you know that Estonia has inspired millions of people in more than 100 countries to clean up their countries?

A small group of Estonian activists started a movement called “Let’s Do It!”. The aim of the action was to clean up Estonia in just one day from the illegal rubbish lying everywhere!

On 3 May 2008, more than 50,000 people (approximately 4% of the population of Estonia) came together, and the entire country was cleaned up in just five hours!

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Tallinn University of Technology

Did you know that Erasmus exchange students picked Estonia as their No 1 European country in which to continue their studies? Tallinn University of Technology is the most international university in Estonia. In 2013, TUT had a total of 1,170 international students (both degree and international students).

Tallinn University of Technology is the only technology university in Estonia and the flagship of engineering and technology education in Estonia. It is at TUT that synergies are generated between engineering and the exact, life, health and social sciences, giving birth to new ideas.

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Venice in Tartu

Did you know that you can come across a bit of Venice in Tartu?

In the City of Tartu, more than anywhere else, glass goblets with high-level enamel paintings, so-called Venetian goblets, have been found.

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The biggest in Baltics – KUMU

Did you know that KUMU has been awarded the title of European Museum of the Year 2008?

The words KUnst and MUuseum have yielded KUMU, which has several further meanings in Estonian: reverberation, hearsay and sensation. The architectural masterpiece by Finnish architect Pekka Vapaavuori houses Estonia’s largest art museum.

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Major trading and harbour site

Did you know that Tallinn was one of the major trading and harbour sites in all of Northern Europe and on the Baltic Sea as early as the Iron Age, linking the broad expanses of Russia with Scandinavia and Central Europe?

The trade route passing through Tallinn ran all the way to the Black Sea from the time before the Hanseatic League. It is thanks to the sea lanes and trade routes that a port evolved there and the Old Town of Tallinn sprang up. Historically, Tallinn has been closely linked to Europe since the 13th century, belonging in the Hanseatic League (1285) and having close ties to the Lübeck, the capital of the League.

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Study in Estonia

Study in Estonia@studyinestonia:

International students ask us why they should study in Estonian universities. What would you say? #whystudyinestonia #interestingtoknow

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16th-century theme park year-round

Did you know that a 16th-century theme park operates at Rakvere Castle year-round? In 2013, it was visited by more than 100,000 people.

At Rakvere Castle, you can have a horseback ride, practice archery, order mediaeval feasts, or hold corporate summer events, weddings or birthdays.

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The lake formed by the tears of a woman

Did you know that there is a lake right beside Tallinn Airport that was formed by the tears of a woman?

One of the best known sites of tradition is Linda’s Stone in Lake Ülemiste, dropped by Linda – mother of Estonians’ mythical national hero, the strongman Kalevipoeg – who shed a lake of tears around it.

Tallinn, which presses up against the lake, however, must never be completed – or else, the Old Man of Ülemiste living in the lake will flood the whole city. Estonia’s landscape abounds in wonderful and interesting stories, which you can learn more about at the Estonian Folklore Archives or by using the various databases compiled by folklorists, which are available at www.folklore.ee/ebaas.

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The world’s all-time longest …

Did you know that the world’s all-time longest wrestling match, lasting 11 hours and 40 minutes, was held by Estonian Martin Klein and Finn Alfred Asikainen at the Stockholm Olympic Games in 1912?

The match between Klein and Asikainen in the under-75kg finals (which consisted of three participants) began at 10:30 in the morning and ended at 10:10 at night with Martin Klein’s victory. Neither Klein nor Asikainen were capable of continuing the match, and so the Swede Claes Johanson, the third to make it to the finals, became the Olympic champion. Martin Klein is shown in a white singlet.

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