A key to
Estonia

For millennia, Tallinn has been a gateway between East and West. Sokos Hotel Estoria is like a key that opens up phenomenon called Estonia. It is a unique and cosy business class hotel that provides high-quality service, opportunity to rest, relax, and learn something interesting about Estonia at the same time.

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Stories of Estonia

The world’s biggest repository of intangible national culture

Did you know that the world’s biggest repository of intangible national culture is the National Library of Estonia? Limestone is Estonia’s national stone.

If all 1.3 million inhabitants of Estonia wished to use printed publications that are kept at the National Library at the same time, we could provide everyone with least two of them. All the literature published in Estonia is there.

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A mummy in Tartu

Did you know that you do not have to go to Egypt to see a mummy? Apart from everything else, the main building of the University of Tartu also houses a mummy.

In 1819, Otto Magnus von Richter, District Magistrate of Livonia, gifted the collection assembled by his son during his travels to the University of Tartu in order to encourage scientific enterprise in the coming generations. Ancient relics also include two human mummies from Egypt and the mummies of a dog and a bird.

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The historical settlements of Tallinn

Did you know that there are more settlements within the 8 urban districts of Tallinn than in London or in Paris?

There 84 historical settlements in Tallinn, 35 in London and 75 in Paris. During the early period of its formation, Tallinn evolved as the twin cities of Toompea and the Lower Town, with both having their own legislation and governing body until 1878. The more complete of the 84 settlements today include the Old Town, the City Centre, Kadriorg, Pirita, Kalamaja, Rocca al Mare and Nõmme. Each of them has preserved the atmosphere and distinctive character of its era.

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Hotel Viru and the KGB

Did you know that once upon a time, there was a hotel called Viru.

The year was 1972 and a little less than 20 years remained until the end of the Soviet era. The hotel for foreigners also had to suit the national security body – the KGB …

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Best of Jazz – Jazzkaar

Did you know that the biggest jazz festival in the Baltic States has been going a year longer than the Republic of Estonia’s renewed period of independence? Jazzkaar has been held since 1990; Estonia regained its independence on 20 August 1991.

Performers at Jazzkaar have won a grand total of over ninety Grammys over the years! The highest number of Grammys, twenty, have been won by the guitar king Pat Metheny, who was also the featured performer at the Jazzkaar anniversary in 2014.

www.jazzkaar.ee

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Open Air Museum

Did you know that Tallinn has one of Estonia’s oldest wooden churches?

Located at the Estonian Open Air Museum, Sutlepa Chapel is one of two wooden churches to have survived in Estonia from Swedish times. Originally located in the Village of Sutlepa in Lääne County, the chapel is mentioned in archival sources as early as 1627, while the year on the outside of the door frame is 1699.

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“Diplômes d’honneur” at the World Exposition

Did you know that the artist Adamson-Eric was awarded two certificates of merit for his porcelain painting and carpets, known as “diplômes d’honneur”, at the 1937 World Exposition?

Adamson-Eric (1902-1968) was an Estonian artist and designer, who created both applied art and Paris-inspired paintings. As an artist, he drew inspiration from everywhere in Europe: France, Italy, Greece, the South of France, Spain, Norway and Finland.

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The world’s oldest Viking ship

Did you know that the world’s oldest Viking ship was discovered in the small town of Salme in Saaremaa in the autumn of 2008?

Dating from the first half of the 7th century, the sailboat is the oldest both in the Baltic Sea region and the world.

If you do not have a sailboat yet, have the islanders build one for you. Saaremaa’s harbours are waiting.

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Peaceful place for great Russians

Did you know that for centuries world-famous figures from Russian culture and society have enjoyed spending time in peaceful Estonia?

Andrei Tarkovsky shot his Stalker in Tallinn, Piotr Tchaikovsky went on holidays to Haapsalu, Fyodor Dostoyevsky nurtured his health in ‘Revel’s baths’, Pushkin’s great-grandfather Abraham Hannibal taught mathematics in Pärnu, and Alexandr Solzhenitsyn wrote The Gulag Archipelago in his friend’s home outside Tartu. Of the various possessions of his state, Peter I, Russia’s first Emperor, it is Estonia that he visited most often.

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