A key to
Estonia

For millennia, Tallinn has been a gateway between East and West. Sokos Hotel Estoria is like a key that opens up phenomenon called Estonia. It is a unique and cosy business class hotel that provides high-quality service, opportunity to rest, relax, and learn something interesting about Estonia at the same time.

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Stories of Estonia

The only magazine in USSR

Did you know that from 1958, the only home decorating magazine, Art and Home (Kunst ja Kodu) Almanac, was published in the Estonian Soviet Socialist Republic?

The Almanac addressed in great detail issues that were related to new homes, mostly small flats, including coverage of their layout and decoration. The publication of ideas by prized interior decorators’ included recommendations for making one’s home as practical and beautiful as possible.

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HeadRead

Did you know that a famous British crime writer is not fazed by Estonia’s climate?

And that’s not all – he helps to organise a literary festival in Estonia.

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The miracle substance Panis Martius

Did you know that the oldest continuously operating café in Tallinn is Café Maiasmokk?

In 1806, the Swiss confectioner Lorenz Caviezel set up his confectioner’s workshop and shop front in the same location. In 1864, the business was bought by the Baltic German confectioner Georg Stude, who joined it to the building on the adjacent lot. It began to produce hand-crafted marzipan figurines and chocolate sweets and cakes, and a café was opened. It is like that to this day.

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Good mud in Haapsalu

Did you know that scientific research into curative mud began in Haapsalu?

For centuries, locals had been soaking their sore limbs in sea mud heated by the sun or in the sauna. Under the leadership of the Haapsalu physician Carl Abraham Hunnius, the first mud treatment establishment was set up in Haapsalu in 1825. To this day, Estonia’s oldest resort is famous for its healing sea mud.

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Sport is good

Did you know that estonians are sport fanatics?

Estonians believe that sport is good, and great athletes always draw much public attention in these parts. Yes, both special sport stars and special sport events are held in esteem in Estonia!

Competing is within everyone’s powers! For example mosquito catching is gaining popularity as a sport. In 2011, Estonia even hosted the World Championships in this event. In this event, everyone can set records – whoever catches the most mosquitoes in two minutes wins!

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From Peter I with love

Did you know that if Peter I had conquered Tallinn as early as 1703, St Petersburg would not have been built?

At the behest of Peter I, an Italianate Baroque palace and garden, something that was unique in the Nordic countries, was built at Kadriorg as a summer residence for the czars. In addition to the renowned Italian architect, Nicola Michetti, Czar Peter I was personally involved in the design of the palace. The entire palace and the park that surrounds it bears the name of the czar’s consort, Catherine I.

In the twentieth century, the palace was the home of the first president of the Republic of Estonia, and for some decades afterwards it belonged to the Art Museum of Estonia. Currently, the palace houses exhibits which showcase Western European art, with the highlights being a collection of art from the Low Countries, a collection of Germany prints, and Russian art from the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries.

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The Kingdom within the Republic

Did you know that the Kingdom of Setomaa lies Estonia’s southeast corner?

Living where East meets West, Seto people also call themselves the King’s people or a vool (free) people. The country is ruled by Peko, the Seto fertility god. On the first Saturday of August, King Peko calls together his people in Setomaa from everywhere and the Seto Kingdom is visited by the President of the Republic of Estonia, who is received by the ülembsootśka.

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A cousin of the Eiffel Tower in Hiiumaa

Did you know that Tahkuna Lighthouse is a cousin of the Eiffel Tower in Paris?

Russia commissioned Tahkuna Lighthouse based on what had been seen at the 1871 World Exposition in Paris. The cast-iron plates of the enclosure were cast in Paris in 1873/1874 and were subsequently erected on a small island named Hiiumaa, which at the time was under the control of imperial Russia. It was said that some parts of the lighthouse were manufactured by the company that also produced the Eiffel Tower.

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The historical settlements of Tallinn

Did you know that there are more settlements within the 8 urban districts of Tallinn than in London or in Paris?

There 84 historical settlements in Tallinn, 35 in London and 75 in Paris. During the early period of its formation, Tallinn evolved as the twin cities of Toompea and the Lower Town, with both having their own legislation and governing body until 1878. The more complete of the 84 settlements today include the Old Town, the City Centre, Kadriorg, Pirita, Kalamaja, Rocca al Mare and Nõmme. Each of them has preserved the atmosphere and distinctive character of its era.

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