A key to
Estonia

For millennia, Tallinn has been a gateway between East and West. Sokos Hotel Estoria is like a key that opens up phenomenon called Estonia. It is a unique and cosy business class hotel that provides high-quality service, opportunity to rest, relax, and learn something interesting about Estonia at the same time.

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Stories of Estonia

One city in two countries

Did you know that Estonia has a city that spans more than one country? That city is Valga / Valka. We share the city amicably with Latvia.

Valga in the early 20th century

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Black Nights Films

Did you know that Tallinn Black Nights Film Festival (Tallinna Pimedate Ööde Filmifestival in Estonian or PÖFF for short) is in an elite category of 50 A-category film festivals in the world?

The wolf symbol takes on a multidimensional meaning during the period from November to December: according to the traditions of the Nordic countries, it is the time of reincarnation.

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Good mud in Haapsalu

Did you know that scientific research into curative mud began in Haapsalu?

For centuries, locals had been soaking their sore limbs in sea mud heated by the sun or in the sauna. Under the leadership of the Haapsalu physician Carl Abraham Hunnius, the first mud treatment establishment was set up in Haapsalu in 1825. To this day, Estonia’s oldest resort is famous for its healing sea mud.

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HeadRead

Did you know that a famous British crime writer is not fazed by Estonia’s climate?

And that’s not all – he helps to organise a literary festival in Estonia.

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The world’s oldest variety of rye grown

Did you know that the world’s oldest variety of rye grown and cultivated to this day comes from Sangaste in Southern Estonia?

In 1875, Count Friedrich Georg Magnus von Berg, Lord of Sangaste Manor, bred a new variety of winter rye.  Frost-hardy, with long stalks and good yields, “Sangaste” won the Grand Prix at the World Exposition in Paris in 1889 and continues to be grown and cultivated to this day. Sangaste is Estonia’s rye village, and its gates open to visitors year-round.

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The Kingdom within the Republic

Did you know that the Kingdom of Setomaa lies Estonia’s southeast corner?

Living where East meets West, Seto people also call themselves the King’s people or a vool (free) people. The country is ruled by Peko, the Seto fertility god. On the first Saturday of August, King Peko calls together his people in Setomaa from everywhere and the Seto Kingdom is visited by the President of the Republic of Estonia, who is received by the ülembsootśka.

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The model for the world – Luscher & Matiesen

Did you know that in the 1930s the model for the world’s juice industry was set by the fresh juices made by Luscher & Matiesen in Tallinn?

In 1934, Dimitri Matiesen began to produce unfermented and unpasteurised fruit and berry juice for his uncle’s winery. In 1936, a congress on unfermented juices was held in Berlin, with 22 countries participating and the world’s renowned experts and specialist researchers repeatedly citing Luscher & Matiesen’s achievements as an example for others.

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The highest in Northern Europe

Do you know what it feels like to dangle your feet sitting on the edge of a roof at a height of 175 meters?

Tallinn TV Tower, which is 314 metres high, sports the highest outdoor terrace in Northern Europe at 175 metres. You can also stroll along the edge of the roof of the TV Tower.

On a fine day, you can see Helsinki, 80 kilometres from Tallinn. For Estonians, the Soviet occupation symbolised the impossibility of seeing the free Europe.

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Impressions about Estonia

Impressions about Estonia from Erasmus programme and degree students – opinions forwarded to Study in Estonia.

Godswill, Nigeria: Estonia was so awesome, good friends, good people, caring, loving and helpful. Every day was a plus towards my career goal.

Carlos, Bogotá: Fascinating. Interesting, challenging. Demanding. Enriching. Time-consuming. Culturally aware. Multicultural.

Adrienne, USA: The benefits of studying in Estonia for me are difficult to summarise. I changed as a student but, even more so, as a human being.

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