Space-faring nation

Did you know that Estonia is a space-faring nation?

Completed as a result of collaboration between the University of Tartu and Tartu Observatory, the ESTCube-1 student satellite flew into orbit on board Vega, the newest launcher of the European Space Agency (ESA) on 7 May 2013.

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The first refracting telescope

Did you know that the world’s first modern refracting telescope is housed in the Tartu Observatory? By using it, the distance of Earth from another star was determined for the first time.

This Fraunhofer refractor was purchased for the Observatory in 1824, and its setup, or design, became immediately known as the “German structure” around the world. From 1824 to 1839, it was the world’s biggest and best telescope of this type, and with minor modifications would enjoy general use for another hundred years.

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Let´s Do It, World!

Did you know that Estonia has inspired millions of people in more than 100 countries to clean up their countries?

A small group of Estonian activists started a movement called “Let’s Do It!”. The aim of the action was to clean up Estonia in just one day from the illegal rubbish lying everywhere!

On 3 May 2008, more than 50,000 people (approximately 4% of the population of Estonia) came together, and the entire country was cleaned up in just five hours!

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“Diplômes d’honneur” at the World Exposition

Did you know that the artist Adamson-Eric was awarded two certificates of merit for his porcelain painting and carpets, known as “diplômes d’honneur”, at the 1937 World Exposition?

Adamson-Eric (1902-1968) was an Estonian artist and designer, who created both applied art and Paris-inspired paintings. As an artist, he drew inspiration from everywhere in Europe: France, Italy, Greece, the South of France, Spain, Norway and Finland.

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HeadRead

Did you know that a famous British crime writer is not fazed by Estonia’s climate?

And that’s not all – he helps to organise a literary festival in Estonia.

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A cousin of the Eiffel Tower in Hiiumaa

Did you know that Tahkuna Lighthouse is a cousin of the Eiffel Tower in Paris?

Russia commissioned Tahkuna Lighthouse based on what had been seen at the 1871 World Exposition in Paris. The cast-iron plates of the enclosure were cast in Paris in 1873/1874 and were subsequently erected on a small island named Hiiumaa, which at the time was under the control of imperial Russia. It was said that some parts of the lighthouse were manufactured by the company that also produced the Eiffel Tower.

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Major trading and harbour site

Did you know that Tallinn was one of the major trading and harbour sites in all of Northern Europe and on the Baltic Sea as early as the Iron Age, linking the broad expanses of Russia with Scandinavia and Central Europe?

The trade route passing through Tallinn ran all the way to the Black Sea from the time before the Hanseatic League. It is thanks to the sea lanes and trade routes that a port evolved there and the Old Town of Tallinn sprang up. Historically, Tallinn has been closely linked to Europe since the 13th century, belonging in the Hanseatic League (1285) and having close ties to the Lübeck, the capital of the League.

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A mediaeval sepulchre in Tartu

Did you know that a mediaeval sepulchre may be visited in Tartu?

It all began in 2008, when archaeologist Martin Malve was investigating the cultural layer amongst the ruins of the Dome Cathedral and found a mediaeval tombstone.

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The most advanced in Europe

Did you know that in 1937 the radio transmitting station with the most advanced antenna tower in Europe stood in the small town of Türi in Estonia?

The tower was commissioned from the United States company Electric Transmission LTD, which under the contract was supposed to make the parts of the tower at the plant of its British subsidiary, transport them to Estonia and assemble them at Türi. Assembly of the antenna tower was completed by the British firm I. L. Eve Construction Company Ltd. as a subcontractor.

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