The world’s all-time longest …

Did you know that the world’s all-time longest wrestling match, lasting 11 hours and 40 minutes, was held by Estonian Martin Klein and Finn Alfred Asikainen at the Stockholm Olympic Games in 1912?

The match between Klein and Asikainen in the under-75kg finals (which consisted of three participants) began at 10:30 in the morning and ended at 10:10 at night with Martin Klein’s victory. Neither Klein nor Asikainen were capable of continuing the match, and so the Swede Claes Johanson, the third to make it to the finals, became the Olympic champion. Martin Klein is shown in a white singlet.

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The model for the world – Luscher & Matiesen

Did you know that in the 1930s the model for the world’s juice industry was set by the fresh juices made by Luscher & Matiesen in Tallinn?

In 1934, Dimitri Matiesen began to produce unfermented and unpasteurised fruit and berry juice for his uncle’s winery. In 1936, a congress on unfermented juices was held in Berlin, with 22 countries participating and the world’s renowned experts and specialist researchers repeatedly citing Luscher & Matiesen’s achievements as an example for others.

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Good mud in Haapsalu

Did you know that scientific research into curative mud began in Haapsalu?

For centuries, locals had been soaking their sore limbs in sea mud heated by the sun or in the sauna. Under the leadership of the Haapsalu physician Carl Abraham Hunnius, the first mud treatment establishment was set up in Haapsalu in 1825. To this day, Estonia’s oldest resort is famous for its healing sea mud.

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16th-century theme park year-round

Did you know that a 16th-century theme park operates at Rakvere Castle year-round? In 2013, it was visited by more than 100,000 people.

At Rakvere Castle, you can have a horseback ride, practice archery, order mediaeval feasts, or hold corporate summer events, weddings or birthdays.

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The fifth season

Did you know that about one-fifth of all land in Estonia is covered by mires? In terms of the abundance of natural mires, we rank third in the world, after Finland and Canada.

The fifth season or high water happens in low-lying wetland areas in spring, mostly in April, when large quantities of water from melting snow pour into the valleys and lowlands. Then you can only get around without getting your feet wet if you use small watercraft or haabjad (dugouts).

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The world’s oldest Viking ship

Did you know that the world’s oldest Viking ship was discovered in the small town of Salme in Saaremaa in the autumn of 2008?

Dating from the first half of the 7th century, the sailboat is the oldest both in the Baltic Sea region and the world.

If you do not have a sailboat yet, have the islanders build one for you. Saaremaa’s harbours are waiting.

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Study in Estonia

Study in Estonia@studyinestonia:

International students ask us why they should study in Estonian universities. What would you say? #whystudyinestonia #interestingtoknow

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Impressions about Estonia

Impressions about Estonia from Erasmus programme and degree students – opinions forwarded to Study in Estonia.

Godswill, Nigeria: Estonia was so awesome, good friends, good people, caring, loving and helpful. Every day was a plus towards my career goal.

Carlos, Bogotá: Fascinating. Interesting, challenging. Demanding. Enriching. Time-consuming. Culturally aware. Multicultural.

Adrienne, USA: The benefits of studying in Estonia for me are difficult to summarise. I changed as a student but, even more so, as a human being.

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The first refracting telescope

Did you know that the world’s first modern refracting telescope is housed in the Tartu Observatory? By using it, the distance of Earth from another star was determined for the first time.

This Fraunhofer refractor was purchased for the Observatory in 1824, and its setup, or design, became immediately known as the “German structure” around the world. From 1824 to 1839, it was the world’s biggest and best telescope of this type, and with minor modifications would enjoy general use for another hundred years.

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