Good mud in Haapsalu

Did you know that scientific research into curative mud began in Haapsalu?

For centuries, locals had been soaking their sore limbs in sea mud heated by the sun or in the sauna. Under the leadership of the Haapsalu physician Carl Abraham Hunnius, the first mud treatment establishment was set up in Haapsalu in 1825. To this day, Estonia’s oldest resort is famous for its healing sea mud.

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“Diplômes d’honneur” at the World Exposition

Did you know that the artist Adamson-Eric was awarded two certificates of merit for his porcelain painting and carpets, known as “diplômes d’honneur”, at the 1937 World Exposition?

Adamson-Eric (1902-1968) was an Estonian artist and designer, who created both applied art and Paris-inspired paintings. As an artist, he drew inspiration from everywhere in Europe: France, Italy, Greece, the South of France, Spain, Norway and Finland.

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The lake formed by the tears of a woman

Did you know that there is a lake right beside Tallinn Airport that was formed by the tears of a woman?

One of the best known sites of tradition is Linda’s Stone in Lake Ülemiste, dropped by Linda – mother of Estonians’ mythical national hero, the strongman Kalevipoeg – who shed a lake of tears around it.

Tallinn, which presses up against the lake, however, must never be completed – or else, the Old Man of Ülemiste living in the lake will flood the whole city. Estonia’s landscape abounds in wonderful and interesting stories, which you can learn more about at the Estonian Folklore Archives or by using the various databases compiled by folklorists, which are available at www.folklore.ee/ebaas.

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Oil shale and jelly lollies

Did you know that oil shale and jelly lollies both share a common origin in algae?

Estonia’s oil shale or kukersite was created 450 to 460 million years ago by algae deposited at the bottom of a shallow sea.

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A cousin of the Eiffel Tower in Hiiumaa

Did you know that Tahkuna Lighthouse is a cousin of the Eiffel Tower in Paris?

Russia commissioned Tahkuna Lighthouse based on what had been seen at the 1871 World Exposition in Paris. The cast-iron plates of the enclosure were cast in Paris in 1873/1874 and were subsequently erected on a small island named Hiiumaa, which at the time was under the control of imperial Russia. It was said that some parts of the lighthouse were manufactured by the company that also produced the Eiffel Tower.

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Where meteorites drop down

Did you know that the first scientifically proven meteorite impact craters in Europe are located in Estonia?

Here, meteorite impact craters number approximately 400 times the average on Earth. Saaremaa has Estonia’s biggest natural rarity, the Kaali Crater, the meteorite origin of which was the first to be proven in Europe and the second in the world after the Arizona craters in the United States.

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Study in Estonia

Study in Estonia@studyinestonia:

International students ask us why they should study in Estonian universities. What would you say? #whystudyinestonia #interestingtoknow

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The historical settlements of Tallinn

Did you know that there are more settlements within the 8 urban districts of Tallinn than in London or in Paris?

There 84 historical settlements in Tallinn, 35 in London and 75 in Paris. During the early period of its formation, Tallinn evolved as the twin cities of Toompea and the Lower Town, with both having their own legislation and governing body until 1878. The more complete of the 84 settlements today include the Old Town, the City Centre, Kadriorg, Pirita, Kalamaja, Rocca al Mare and Nõmme. Each of them has preserved the atmosphere and distinctive character of its era.

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The Oldest Theatre

Did you know that every Estonian goes to the theatre at least once a year? Why? A powerful and time-old belief persists that Estonians’ lives can be made more substantial by going to see theatrical performances.

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