When a child talks?

Did you know that a child talks when a chicken takes a pee?

In times gone by, a well-behaved child had first and foremost to be quiet and polite. What have young artists aged between just fourteen and nineteen got to say these days?

Tallinn plays host to Eksperimenta!, a unique triennial of contemporary art by school-age youngsters.

Read more

Sport is good

Did you know that estonians are sport fanatics?

Estonians believe that sport is good, and great athletes always draw much public attention in these parts. Yes, both special sport stars and special sport events are held in esteem in Estonia!

Competing is within everyone’s powers! For example mosquito catching is gaining popularity as a sport. In 2011, Estonia even hosted the World Championships in this event. In this event, everyone can set records – whoever catches the most mosquitoes in two minutes wins!

Read more

Aphrodisiacs, arousing love and passion

Did you know that orchids in Estonian folk tradition are known for being aphrodisiacs, arousing love and passion?

Orchids are thought to symbolise allure, resilience, and rare and fragile beauty. They are the subject of numerous legends and beliefs to this day. Common spotted-orchid, Dactylorhiza fuchsii.

Read more

The Oldest Theatre

Did you know that every Estonian goes to the theatre at least once a year? Why? A powerful and time-old belief persists that Estonians’ lives can be made more substantial by going to see theatrical performances.

Read more

Oil shale and jelly lollies

Did you know that oil shale and jelly lollies both share a common origin in algae?

Estonia’s oil shale or kukersite was created 450 to 460 million years ago by algae deposited at the bottom of a shallow sea.

Read more

“Diplômes d’honneur” at the World Exposition

Did you know that the artist Adamson-Eric was awarded two certificates of merit for his porcelain painting and carpets, known as “diplômes d’honneur”, at the 1937 World Exposition?

Adamson-Eric (1902-1968) was an Estonian artist and designer, who created both applied art and Paris-inspired paintings. As an artist, he drew inspiration from everywhere in Europe: France, Italy, Greece, the South of France, Spain, Norway and Finland.

Read more

The highest in Northern Europe

Do you know what it feels like to dangle your feet sitting on the edge of a roof at a height of 175 meters?

Tallinn TV Tower, which is 314 metres high, sports the highest outdoor terrace in Northern Europe at 175 metres. You can also stroll along the edge of the roof of the TV Tower.

On a fine day, you can see Helsinki, 80 kilometres from Tallinn. For Estonians, the Soviet occupation symbolised the impossibility of seeing the free Europe.

Read more

Where meteorites drop down

Did you know that the first scientifically proven meteorite impact craters in Europe are located in Estonia?

Here, meteorite impact craters number approximately 400 times the average on Earth. Saaremaa has Estonia’s biggest natural rarity, the Kaali Crater, the meteorite origin of which was the first to be proven in Europe and the second in the world after the Arizona craters in the United States.

Read more

A mummy in Tartu

Did you know that you do not have to go to Egypt to see a mummy? Apart from everything else, the main building of the University of Tartu also houses a mummy.

In 1819, Otto Magnus von Richter, District Magistrate of Livonia, gifted the collection assembled by his son during his travels to the University of Tartu in order to encourage scientific enterprise in the coming generations. Ancient relics also include two human mummies from Egypt and the mummies of a dog and a bird.

Read more