The world’s biggest repository of intangible national culture

Did you know that the world’s biggest repository of intangible national culture is the National Library of Estonia? Limestone is Estonia’s national stone.

If all 1.3 million inhabitants of Estonia wished to use printed publications that are kept at the National Library at the same time, we could provide everyone with least two of them. All the literature published in Estonia is there.

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Traditional and unique housing

Did you know that Estonians’ traditional housing is unique in the world?

The mighty building, merging with nature, accommodated nearly the entirety of a farmer’s household under the one roof; it is not without reason that the popular designation of a farmhouse was multivalent: elu (life). Outside Estonia, this kind of distinctive dwelling is only common in the areas of the former Governorate of Livonia, in North Latvia.

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Your and our Tallinn

Did you know that the oldest capital city in the Baltic Sea region was in fact mostly inhabited and ruled by foreigners – Danes, Germans, Swedes, Russians – from the 13th to the 19th centuries, and Estonians could only begin to claim Tallinn as their own city from the 1920s?

There were most likely earlier Estonian settlements during the 11th and 12th centuries on the present day location of Tallinn – Estonian clans used the area of what is now the Tallinn as a marketplace, and they utilised the natural harbour and maintained a wooden fortress on Toompea hill. 1154 – Tallinn is first mentioned in historic records by Arab cartographer al-Idrisi (Tallinn as Qlwr, Kolyvan, Koluvan, Kalewen by Lindanäs/Lyndanise)

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Open Air Museum

Did you know that Tallinn has one of Estonia’s oldest wooden churches?

Located at the Estonian Open Air Museum, Sutlepa Chapel is one of two wooden churches to have survived in Estonia from Swedish times. Originally located in the Village of Sutlepa in Lääne County, the chapel is mentioned in archival sources as early as 1627, while the year on the outside of the door frame is 1699.

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One city in two countries

Did you know that Estonia has a city that spans more than one country? That city is Valga / Valka. We share the city amicably with Latvia.

Valga in the early 20th century

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Peaceful place for great Russians

Did you know that for centuries world-famous figures from Russian culture and society have enjoyed spending time in peaceful Estonia?

Andrei Tarkovsky shot his Stalker in Tallinn, Piotr Tchaikovsky went on holidays to Haapsalu, Fyodor Dostoyevsky nurtured his health in ‘Revel’s baths’, Pushkin’s great-grandfather Abraham Hannibal taught mathematics in Pärnu, and Alexandr Solzhenitsyn wrote The Gulag Archipelago in his friend’s home outside Tartu. Of the various possessions of his state, Peter I, Russia’s first Emperor, it is Estonia that he visited most often.

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16th-century theme park year-round

Did you know that a 16th-century theme park operates at Rakvere Castle year-round? In 2013, it was visited by more than 100,000 people.

At Rakvere Castle, you can have a horseback ride, practice archery, order mediaeval feasts, or hold corporate summer events, weddings or birthdays.

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Tallinn University of Technology

Did you know that Erasmus exchange students picked Estonia as their No 1 European country in which to continue their studies? Tallinn University of Technology is the most international university in Estonia. In 2013, TUT had a total of 1,170 international students (both degree and international students).

Tallinn University of Technology is the only technology university in Estonia and the flagship of engineering and technology education in Estonia. It is at TUT that synergies are generated between engineering and the exact, life, health and social sciences, giving birth to new ideas.

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HeadRead

Did you know that a famous British crime writer is not fazed by Estonia’s climate?

And that’s not all – he helps to organise a literary festival in Estonia.

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