Võti Eestisse

Tallinn on juba aastatuhandeid sümboliseerinud väravat. Ida poolt tulijatele oli linn viimane kants enne lääne magusaid ahvatlusi. Lääne poolt saabujate jaoks kujuneti vankumatuks lävepakuks ida varjatud rikkuste juurde. Eesti oma inimestele on pealinn Tallinn alati olnud väravaks suurde maailma.
Külalistele suurest maailmast on aga ESTORIA väravaks Eesti lugude juurde.

Loe lisa

Lugudevaramu

The only magazine in USSR

Did you know that from 1958, the only home decorating magazine, Art and Home (Kunst ja Kodu) Almanac, was published in the Estonian Soviet Socialist Republic?

The Almanac addressed in great detail issues that were related to new homes, mostly small flats, including coverage of their layout and decoration. The publication of ideas by prized interior decorators’ included recommendations for making one’s home as practical and beautiful as possible.

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Study in Estonia

Study in Estonia@studyinestonia:

International students ask us why they should study in Estonian universities. What would you say? #whystudyinestonia #interestingtoknow

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The fifth season

Did you know that about one-fifth of all land in Estonia is covered by mires? In terms of the abundance of natural mires, we rank third in the world, after Finland and Canada.

The fifth season or high water happens in low-lying wetland areas in spring, mostly in April, when large quantities of water from melting snow pour into the valleys and lowlands. Then you can only get around without getting your feet wet if you use small watercraft or haabjad (dugouts).

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Space-faring nation

Did you know that Estonia is a space-faring nation?

Completed as a result of collaboration between the University of Tartu and Tartu Observatory, the ESTCube-1 student satellite flew into orbit on board Vega, the newest launcher of the European Space Agency (ESA) on 7 May 2013.

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The world’s biggest repository of intangible national culture

Did you know that the world’s biggest repository of intangible national culture is the National Library of Estonia? Limestone is Estonia’s national stone.

If all 1.3 million inhabitants of Estonia wished to use printed publications that are kept at the National Library at the same time, we could provide everyone with least two of them. All the literature published in Estonia is there.

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The highest in Northern Europe

Do you know what it feels like to dangle your feet sitting on the edge of a roof at a height of 175 meters?

Tallinn TV Tower, which is 314 metres high, sports the highest outdoor terrace in Northern Europe at 175 metres. You can also stroll along the edge of the roof of the TV Tower.

On a fine day, you can see Helsinki, 80 kilometres from Tallinn. For Estonians, the Soviet occupation symbolised the impossibility of seeing the free Europe.

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The lake formed by the tears of a woman

Did you know that there is a lake right beside Tallinn Airport that was formed by the tears of a woman?

One of the best known sites of tradition is Linda’s Stone in Lake Ülemiste, dropped by Linda – mother of Estonians’ mythical national hero, the strongman Kalevipoeg – who shed a lake of tears around it.

Tallinn, which presses up against the lake, however, must never be completed – or else, the Old Man of Ülemiste living in the lake will flood the whole city. Estonia’s landscape abounds in wonderful and interesting stories, which you can learn more about at the Estonian Folklore Archives or by using the various databases compiled by folklorists, which are available at www.folklore.ee/ebaas.

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The first refracting telescope

Did you know that the world’s first modern refracting telescope is housed in the Tartu Observatory? By using it, the distance of Earth from another star was determined for the first time.

This Fraunhofer refractor was purchased for the Observatory in 1824, and its setup, or design, became immediately known as the “German structure” around the world. From 1824 to 1839, it was the world’s biggest and best telescope of this type, and with minor modifications would enjoy general use for another hundred years.

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From Peter I with love

Did you know that if Peter I had conquered Tallinn as early as 1703, St Petersburg would not have been built?

At the behest of Peter I, an Italianate Baroque palace and garden, something that was unique in the Nordic countries, was built at Kadriorg as a summer residence for the czars. In addition to the renowned Italian architect, Nicola Michetti, Czar Peter I was personally involved in the design of the palace. The entire palace and the park that surrounds it bears the name of the czar’s consort, Catherine I.

In the twentieth century, the palace was the home of the first president of the Republic of Estonia, and for some decades afterwards it belonged to the Art Museum of Estonia. Currently, the palace houses exhibits which showcase Western European art, with the highlights being a collection of art from the Low Countries, a collection of Germany prints, and Russian art from the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries.

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