The most advanced in Europe

Did you know that in 1937 the radio transmitting station with the most advanced antenna tower in Europe stood in the small town of Türi in Estonia?

The tower was commissioned from the United States company Electric Transmission LTD, which under the contract was supposed to make the parts of the tower at the plant of its British subsidiary, transport them to Estonia and assemble them at Türi. Assembly of the antenna tower was completed by the British firm I. L. Eve Construction Company Ltd. as a subcontractor.

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The highest in Northern Europe

Do you know what it feels like to dangle your feet sitting on the edge of a roof at a height of 175 meters?

Tallinn TV Tower, which is 314 metres high, sports the highest outdoor terrace in Northern Europe at 175 metres. You can also stroll along the edge of the roof of the TV Tower.

On a fine day, you can see Helsinki, 80 kilometres from Tallinn. For Estonians, the Soviet occupation symbolised the impossibility of seeing the free Europe.

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The miracle substance Panis Martius

Did you know that the oldest continuously operating café in Tallinn is Café Maiasmokk?

In 1806, the Swiss confectioner Lorenz Caviezel set up his confectioner’s workshop and shop front in the same location. In 1864, the business was bought by the Baltic German confectioner Georg Stude, who joined it to the building on the adjacent lot. It began to produce hand-crafted marzipan figurines and chocolate sweets and cakes, and a café was opened. It is like that to this day.

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When a child talks?

Did you know that a child talks when a chicken takes a pee?

In times gone by, a well-behaved child had first and foremost to be quiet and polite. What have young artists aged between just fourteen and nineteen got to say these days?

Tallinn plays host to Eksperimenta!, a unique triennial of contemporary art by school-age youngsters.

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The Kingdom within the Republic

Did you know that the Kingdom of Setomaa lies Estonia’s southeast corner?

Living where East meets West, Seto people also call themselves the King’s people or a vool (free) people. The country is ruled by Peko, the Seto fertility god. On the first Saturday of August, King Peko calls together his people in Setomaa from everywhere and the Seto Kingdom is visited by the President of the Republic of Estonia, who is received by the ülembsootśka.

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Let´s Do It, World!

Did you know that Estonia has inspired millions of people in more than 100 countries to clean up their countries?

A small group of Estonian activists started a movement called “Let’s Do It!”. The aim of the action was to clean up Estonia in just one day from the illegal rubbish lying everywhere!

On 3 May 2008, more than 50,000 people (approximately 4% of the population of Estonia) came together, and the entire country was cleaned up in just five hours!

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Aphrodisiacs, arousing love and passion

Did you know that orchids in Estonian folk tradition are known for being aphrodisiacs, arousing love and passion?

Orchids are thought to symbolise allure, resilience, and rare and fragile beauty. They are the subject of numerous legends and beliefs to this day. Common spotted-orchid, Dactylorhiza fuchsii.

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Open Air Museum

Did you know that Tallinn has one of Estonia’s oldest wooden churches?

Located at the Estonian Open Air Museum, Sutlepa Chapel is one of two wooden churches to have survived in Estonia from Swedish times. Originally located in the Village of Sutlepa in Lääne County, the chapel is mentioned in archival sources as early as 1627, while the year on the outside of the door frame is 1699.

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Black Nights Films

Did you know that Tallinn Black Nights Film Festival (Tallinna Pimedate Ööde Filmifestival in Estonian or PÖFF for short) is in an elite category of 50 A-category film festivals in the world?

The wolf symbol takes on a multidimensional meaning during the period from November to December: according to the traditions of the Nordic countries, it is the time of reincarnation.

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